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Monthly Archives: September 2015

Success strategies for introvert leaders – early bird deadline on September 30

Introvert written in search bar on virtual screenOur next online event – Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day! – is coming up quickly. In fact, the early bird deadline to register is almost here – only two more days to take advantage of significant savings – just until Wednesday September 30.

If you’re an introvert, unfortunately, fair or not, you’re often at a leadership disadvantage. In a world that frequently associates outspokenness with leadership, introverts are often misjudged, or even worse, undervalued for their leadership skills. But it’s time to take control and change this erroneous perception. On October 7, I’ll be leading a live online event “Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day!” and I hope you’ll join me. In one fast-paced content-rich hour, I’ll give you the tools you need to make the most of your natural traits so that you are recognized as a competent, capable and collaborative leader who knows how to get things done! Through my leadership development practice, I’ve been privileged to work closely with hundreds of exceptional introverted leaders, and in this power-packed event, I’ve distilled their critical success factors into one jam-packed hour. Bottom line: you don’t have to become an extrovert in order to be a powerful leader.

Click here to register now

Here’s just some of what you’ll learn: Continue reading

Do extroverts always make better leaders than introverts?

For the last few weeks, I have been diligently researching material for a new online program I am doing next month titled Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day! and I came across this very interesting 2011 paper that I couldn’t resist sharing on the blog today. A study in the Academy of Management Journal looked at whether your tendency to be an extrovert or an introvert affects your ability to be a good leader. Extrovert vs Introvert Concept of Choosing Between the Two ChoicFirst let me quickly define the two. Contrary to popular belief, the difference between extroverts and introverts is not how outgoing or shy a person is, but rather where the person’s energy comes from. Introverts lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds, and tend to recharge by spending time alone. Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people; they actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.

Current mainstream experience and the popular press tends to suggest that extroversion is a better indicator of leadership effectiveness, but researchers Grant, Gino and Hofmann discovered that this is not the case. To answer the question posed in the title of this post, whether or not extroverts or introverts are more effective as leaders depends on the motivation and skill level of the employee being supervised. Continue reading

Upcoming leadership training events in Edmonton and Calgary

As many of you know, a key offering in my leadership development practice are the on-site training programs I conduct for groups of leaders in different client organizations. These programs are usually just for employees of that specific company and not open to the public. But frequently, individual leaders ask me when there will be a “public” program in their area that anyone (from any organization) can attend. Unfortunately, my usual answer is “I don’t do very many public seminars 🙁 “. But … if you live in Alberta, Canada, that is about to change!

CPAI am thrilled to announce our partnership with the Chartered Professional Accountants of Alberta (CPA Alberta) in which I am delivering twelve full-day leadership and workplace communication programs over the next six months in Edmonton and Calgary. These programs are available to anyone from any organization … you DO NOT have to be a member of CPA Alberta to register. If you work in a smaller organization that doesn’t have the budget to conduct an onsite leadership training program, this is your chance to invest in yourself and your leaders’ competency and skill development! These one-day sessions are very reasonably priced at $525 per day (and include a continental breakfast and lunch!), a fraction of what it can cost through some commercial vendors. Plus, I’m facilitating them … how could they get any better? 🙂 Continue reading

(Perceived) fairness is important if you are a leader

Fairness. Wanting to be treated fairly is a primal instinct. A concept worth considering if you are a leader. Watch this very illustrative video of an experiment conducted by Frans de Waal, famed Dutch primatologist and ethologist. This particular experiment observed how a Capuchin monkey behaved when she was exposed to what she perceived as unfairness. If nothing else, it’s highly entertaining and you’ll likely laugh out loud.

Funny and enlightening, isn’t it? Given that human beings are primates, this certainly offers serious food for thought as to how employees might feel when they perceive that they are being treated unfairly compared to their peers.

Every good leader I know understands the importance of treating employees fairly. Continue reading

What vs how – Amazon’s leadership lost their balance

Last month, The Globe & Mail asked me to write a piece for their Weekend Commentary & Analysis section about Amazon’s controversial and (some say) “toxic” corporate culture. I blogged about the article soon after it was published in What vs how – Amazon lost sight of the difference. But this topic continues to dominate the news, and is of such great importance and relevance to leaders everywhere that I felt that it deserved to be brought up one more time today.

NYT_Amazon_081515First some background. The tumult started on August 15 when the New York Times published a lengthy story about Amazon’s “bruising” work culture where only the fittest survive, and the rest are discarded as collateral damage along the way. Continue reading

Introverts make great leaders! – live online event on October 7

Business man pointing the text: Are You an Introvert?Do you generally tend to be quieter, more reserved, and less likely to speak up until you’ve had adequate time to think things through? If so, then you’re probably an introvert, and unfortunately often at a leadership disadvantage. Right or wrong, in a world that frequently associates outspokenness with leadership, introverts such as you are often misjudged, or even worse, undervalued for your leadership skills. But it’s time to take control and change this erroneous perception. On October 7, I’ll be leading a live online event “Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day!” and I hope you’ll join me. In one fast-paced content-rich hour, I’ll give you the tools you need to make the most of your natural traits so that you are recognized as a competent, capable and collaborative leader who knows how to get things done!

If you’ve met me personally, then you know that I’m an extrovert, so you may wonder what I could possibly teach you on this topic. After all, I haven’t walked in exactly your shoes. But … don’t underestimate what I can offer you. I’ve been privileged to work closely with hundreds of exceptional introverted leaders in my leadership development practice. Through my thousands of conversations with these very effective leaders, I’ve been able to distill their critical success factors into this powerful online program. The good news is that you don’t have to become an extrovert in order to be a powerful leader.   Introverts bring strong leadership abilities to the table; but you have to know how to showcase and use your strengths to their best advantage. And this is exactly where I can help!

Click here to register now

In one power-packed hour, you’ll learn how to capitalize on your strengths and avoid the pitfalls. You owe it to yourself to maximize your leadership potential! And if you act by September 30, you can take advantage of early bird savings. Here’s just some of what you’ll learn: Continue reading

Procrastination: why do today what you can put off till tomorrow?

My latest column for ProfitGuide.com is up this morning. Today’s column is part of Productivity Week and is about how leaders (or anybody) can overcome the endless cycle of procrastination. You know … the one where you put off doing stuff until it becomes critical, vow that you’ll never put yourself in that situation again, but of course, finding yourself exhausted from the last sprint to the finish line find yourself in exactly the same condition yet another time!

A 9-Point Plan for Overcoming Procrastination

ProfitGuide090815

So these are my top five ideas for ways to overcome procrastination – what are yours? Please share what has worked (or not) for you and let’s learn from one another.

P.S. In case you didn’t know, I am a regular member of ProfitGuide.com’s panel of business experts. You can find links to my previous columns on their site. For your information, Profit Magazine is a sister publication to Canadian business magazine giants Canadian Business, MoneySense and Macleans, so I’m pretty chuffed to be in such esteemed company.

Leaders: want to stay relevant? Challenge the status quo

SidRidgleyI’ve blogged in the past about the importance of pushing for change when you’re a leader. See Implementing change should be like shaking a champagne bottle and Survival depends on how you transform to fit your environment. And this is exactly the message that my professional colleague and friend Sid Ridgley delivers in his guest post today. Sid’s expertise lies in helping leaders increase their company’s value proposition to its customers, employees and shareholders through intensive organizational development strategies, and I’m very excited to share his words of wisdom with all of you.

“The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it” -Warren Bennis

It is perfectly natural to want to keep things intact, seek calm and predictability. After-all, today’s status quo was the result of yesterday’s disruption. Status quo means arriving at the place called “ok” where people are focused on keeping things the same and being content with mediocre results. The trouble is, the world and its people are constantly change. Managers are rewarded for meeting performance targets while keeping within the people, financial and organizational resources that have been budgeted. Typically when managers are asked to “challenge the status quo” they invariably react by focusing on process efficiency. None-the-less, and let’s be clear, the functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and evaluating takes the guesswork out of whether or not an organization will achieve some results. But greatness is an illusion. Continue reading