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Tag Archives: workplace motivators

One year of video tips on employee motivation … coming up in 2018

I am thrilled to announce that we have big plans for 2018 – a whole year of video tips specifically focusing on employee motivation!!

This past year, upon urging from many of you, I made the decision to post more video blogs.  You all told me that you appreciated hearing quick, specific, and actionable tips that you could implement immediately.  So back in February, as an experiment, I started with a short video series on making the switch from a non-supervisory to a management role – seven individual discrete tips to help you seamlessly move into the new role of a supervisor.  The response was so positive that I was persuaded to try again.  So in April, I started another eight tip video series – this time on leading virtual teams.  In it, I offered up, again, specific practical ideas, on how to make long-distance leadership work.  When that turned out to be a success, I went all in, launching a 15-part video series in June on leading organizational change.  Well, you’ve continued to tell me that you like these – that they’re quick and easy to internalize and implement, and that you’d like some more.

2018 … one whole year of video tips on how to motivate employees

So I can’t stop now, and I’ve got big plans for next year.  2018 is going to be the year to focus on and highlight ideas on employee motivation.  Actually, more specifically, zero and low-cost ways to inspire, encourage and excite your people – to greater positivity and productivity, to higher performance and greater commitment. Continue reading

Creating happier workplaces – what the data definitively tells us

bigstock-147197099I was reminded last week of the importance of creating positive happier workplaces with the release of the 2017 World Happiness report, published to coincide with the United Nation’s International Day of Happiness.  Given that most people spend a large percentage of their lives working, it’s not surprising that there is an entire chapter in this report devoted to the relationship between work and happiness.  The complete report is 178 pages long and can be found at the link above, but in today’s post I thought I’d share some of the highlights about happier workplaces from the “Happiness at Work” chapter.

The data that this report is based on comes from reliable sources and large sample sizes; the authors draw largely upon the Gallup World Poll, which has been surveying people in over 150 countries around the world since 2006.  The fundamental question being asked is what and how do people’s working lives drive their well-being, or what does it take to create happier workplaces.  Continue reading

Money as a motivator (P.S. It’s not!)

Exciting news – my first column for 2017 in The Globe & Mail‘s Leadership Lab series just got published this morning!!  It’s about money as a motivator, which continues to be a subject of some controversy.  And in case you’re wondering about my point of view, it’s unequivocally that it’s not!   In Why money is not an employee motivator, I make the case for why, and perhaps more importantly and practically, I tell you what it means to you, a leader, so that you can inspire your people towards excellence in the workplace.

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Now, my hope, as always, is that this will give you food for thought and spark a dialogue amongst leaders everywhere, ideally in agreement with my point of view.  But even if you don’t agree with me, I’d like to hear what you think and what your experiences are.  If you can, please share your perspectives directly on the The Globe‘s site since your opinion will get a much wider audience there.  But I’m always open to hearing from you directly as well, so you can drop me an email or send me a tweet (@mergespeaks) with your thoughts too.

Please help get the word out!

And one last thing — do me a HUGE favour – help me get the word out … share the link with your staff and colleagues (easiest directly from The Globe’s site using the share icon at the very top of the article).  My objective is always to get conversations started, so the more people who respond to this column means deeper and extended dialogue, which is always a good thing!  In advance, please accept my thanks for your help.

I’m looking forward to hearing from you. Here is a direct link to the article in case you need to cut and paste it elsewhere: https://tgam.ca/2k8ulMJ

The piss-off factor: yet another short-sighted stupid action by a well-meaning manager

The Piss-Off Factor (or POF)piss-off factor is something that short-sighted managers do to destroy employee morale, and they come up repeatedly on the blog, usually because they happen more often than they should!  Well, I was just made aware the other day of yet another piss-off event; this time about parking!

Seriously?!  This is what is known as a piss-off factor

This company’s offices, even though in a large city, are not in the downtown core.  This particular employee was required to go downtown for a work-related task, so he drove his vehicle there, parked, and later claimed the cost of parking on his expense statement.  Sounds reasonable, right?  Apparently not.  His expense claim was denied.  Reason: the company policy states that employees can claim lodging, meals and incidental costs, including parking for a vehicle, ONLY when they travel out of town.  Because he was parking his vehicle in the same city, the expense claim was denied!  If you think this doesn’t make sense, there’s more.  Continue reading

16 ways to motivate your people without spending money

Money isn’t a motivator.  There, I said it!  But don’t just take my word for it.  In my latest column for ProfitGuide.com – 16 Ways to Motivate Your People Without Spending Money – I not only give you the research that backs up this statement, but I also offer sixteen zero- or low-cost ideas to reward your employees on a shoestring budget.

You need to pay people fairly but …

Sure, you need to pay your people, and pay them fairly—you’re not going to accomplish much if your staff feel like their compensation doesn’t reflect the fair market value of their work. But while lack of money can be a de-motivator, cash alone won’t make employees do their best.

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So what low-cost motivation ideas do you have to add?  What are some of the things you do to inspire, encourage, and motivate your people to high performance?  Would love to hear what works for you.  Please share by commenting below.

P.S. I am now in my second year as a regular contributor to ProfitGuide.com’s panel of business experts. You can find links to my previous columns on their site. For your information, Profit Magazine is a sister publication to Canadian business magazine giants Canadian Business, MoneySense and Macleans, and their list of columnists reads like the Who’s Who of Canadian business, so I am honoured to be in such distinguished company.

Blocking internal transfers and promotions is a bad idea!

Demotivator on Warning Road SignSometimes, managers deliberately and consciously take actions that while logical, create situations that are non-productive and hugely demotivating. In fact, I wrote about just this topic in one of my regular The Globe & Mail columns titled Why do smart managers do stupid things?  Well it happened again!  I got a call from an employee at a large client company the other day, very upset because his manager had blocked his internal transfer.  This organization has an online internal job bulletin board that permits employees to apply for internal jobs within the company.  This particular employee had, with his manager’s knowledge, applied for a job in another department.  Since he has been in his current role for over three years, he was seeking different challenges and new learning opportunities.  The interview process went well and he was optimistic about getting this new assignment.  Imagine his surprise to learn that he did not get the job because his manager had blocked the transfer.  Turns out that there had been some other recent unexpected personnel changes in the department, and his manager felt that his move would be too much change, too fast. Continue reading

Forced ranking of employees is a foolish approach

It’s up!  After a short hiatus from writing for The Globe & Mail, my latest column is out in cyberspace, and this edition addresses a subject that is controversial in many of my client organizations, particularly larger ones — the topic of forced ranking of employee performance.  In Forced employee ranking is a foolish approach, I make the case for why bell-curving and forced numerical ranking have absolutely no place in high-performance workplaces.

G&M051016So … you know my opinion on this subject, but I’d love to know what you think.  Forced employee ranking – brilliant concept or stupid management practice?  If possible, please share your perspectives directly on the The Globe‘s site since your point of view will get a much wider audience than if you choose another alternative.  But I’m always open to hearing from you directly as well, so you can post your comments here on the blog, or send me a tweet (@mergespeaks) with your thoughts too.

And one last thing — do me a HUGE favour – help me get the word out … share the link with your staff and colleagues (easiest directly from The Globe’s site using the share icon at the very top of the article).  My objective is always to get conversations started, so the more people that react to this column means deeper and extended dialogue, which is always a good thing!  In advance, please accept my thanks for your help.

I’m looking forward to hearing from you. Here is a direct link to the article in case you need to cut and paste it elsewhere: http://tgam.ca/EOig

Trying to motivate your employees? Could you be inadvertently demotivating them?

Demotivator on Warning Road SignA while ago, I wrote a blog post titled How to lower productivity and demotivate your workforce that illustrated how process bottlenecks stopped employees from being productive and motivated. And sometimes, managers deliberately and consciously take actions that while logical, inadvertently create situations that are non-productive and demotivating. In fact, I wrote a column about just this topic in The Globe & Mail last November titled Why do smart managers do stupid things? Today’s blog post takes this quandary further. Today’s topic is about when things that are intended to motivate people not only turn out to be hugely demotivating, but also actually incent people to act in the absolute opposite way than was meant. As leaders charged with inspiring and encouraging staff, it’s important to consider whether our good intentions may in fact be producing an unexpected negative result. Let me share some interesting (and unusual) examples of incentives that, while good-intentioned, were hugely demotivating. Continue reading

Five foolproof ways to demotivate your employees

My latest Leadership Lab column in The Globe & Mail is up on their site today.

Five foolproof ways to destroy employee morale

is about what some managers do to completely destroy their employees’ self-confidence, drag down team morale, and create a negative working environment. In short, they demotivate their people! Fortunately, most of the leaders I work with are keenly focused on keeping their people committed and loyal because they know that engaged and empowered employees perform to their highest abilities and produce exceptional results. But every so often, I come across managers who seem hell bent on doing just the opposite. Not surprisingly, their staff hate coming to work, and positivity and productivity plummets. This is their story of failure.

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Well, what do you have to add to the list? What have you seen that demotivates, demoralizes and disempowers employees? Rather than comment here on the blog, please add your viewpoint directly to The Globe‘s site, as their (much larger) readership will also have a chance to join the discussion. Or send me a tweet (@mergespeaks). I’m eagerly looking forward to your reactions and perspectives.

And please do me one more favour – help me get the word out … pass the link along to your staff and colleagues. I’d love to hear their thoughts as well; I bet they have a few to add to this list!

I’m looking forward to hearing from you. Here is a direct link to the article in case you need to cut and paste it elsewhere: http://tgam.ca/ELDe

Praising employees who are in their 40s and 50s – is it necessary?

KarlMooreI often blog about the value of praising employees (one such post is Frequent and liberal employee recognition and praise creates positive workplaces). So when Dr. Karl Moore, associate professor at the Destautels Faculty of Management at McGill University (and my fellow columnist at The Globe & Mail) recently wrote a piece on this topic, it captured my attention. Why do people in their 40s and 50s receive less praise? published in the Leadership Lab a couple of weeks ago, and in it, Dr. Moore makes four key points. Continue reading