Merge's Blog

Tag Archives: communication styles

Consider your (and the other person’s) personality profile to improve your communication

Nathalie Plamondon-ThomasMy professional colleague, Nathalie Plamondon-Thomas, is a Transformation Expert, an 8 times International Bestselling Author, and the Founder of the THINK Yourself® Academy.  I am thrilled that she is guesting on the blog today, sharing her STYLE-L.I.S.T. assessment tool to discover your personality profile, so that you can interact better with people around you.

 

THE FOUR STYLE-L.I.S.T. AT A GLANCE

Do you find it challenging to connect with some of your coworkers, staff or superiors? Sometimes, you feel that they just don’t get it. They are clueless. However, the mismatch in communication may be due to the fact that You are not speaking their language.

Recognizing your own and the personality profile of the people you interact with can transform the way you collaborate, communicate, sell, lead and get along with others.  Using their preferred language can contribute to avoid conflicts and uncover potential areas of interpersonal complements with others.

Understanding the similarities and differences allows you to build on strengths, yours and theirs, as well as establishing strong and happy long-lasting relationships through excellent communication.

Here are the four personality styles that surround you and some suggested words to use when you want to get your point across. Continue reading

Build a stronger working relationship by learning more about your boss’ style

Last week I started a series of blog posts on how to build a stronger relationship with your boss by talking about the importance of keeping your boss informed.

Conversation of  business peopleContinuing with that series, here’s a second idea: learn more about your boss’ style.  Is he a big picture or a detail person? Does she prefer to work with in-depth background information or summarized recommendations? Does he have a tendency to micro-manage or is he comfortable with a more hands-off approach?  When you know more about your boss’ style, you can flex your style to become more useful and reliable to him or her.  Don’t be afraid to ask specific questions about your boss’ working style. Listening and acting on the answers is just good sense — it will set you well on the path to repeated success. Continue reading

Choose your words carefully — it makes a difference

This video is just under six minutes long and it’s really worth the watch.  It was first presented at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival and it went on to win the short story category.  Don’t let the fact that it’s in Spanish throw you off – it’s subtitled in English and there isn’t that much dialogue anyway.  To get you started, the first hand-written sign says “Ten compassion, estoy siego” which means “Have compassion, I am blind”.

The most powerful message I got from this video was that your choice of words matters.  And that’s a lesson worth paying attention to in your role as a leader.  Whether it’s asking one of your staff to meet a deadline, offering feedback to an employee about a negative behaviour you’d like him to change, or praising a team member for a job well done, your choice of words will make a difference.  It’s been my experience, over and over again, that what you say is just as important as how you say it.

What about you?  Have you observed situations where the right words helped get things done?  Or where the wrong choice of words just made things worse?

$1 online webinar – Dealing with Difficult Personalities

PRACTICALLY FREE! That’s right! One dollar! I’m not kidding!

The great folks at PDNet and CGA are sponsoring this live webinar “Dealing with Difficult Personalities” on Tuesday October 6, 2009 at 9 AM Pacific Standard Time.  CGA Webcasts are normally priced at $169, but this is a special one-time price for only $1!  YOU MUST REGISTER BY MONDAY SEPTEMBER 28. SO DON’T MISS OUT! Over 2,000 people are already registered, so don’t wait!  To register, or get more information, go to http://tiny.cc/HupEG.  Don’t thank me, thank the generous folks at PDNet!

Continue reading