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Tag Archives: EQ self-assessment

Self-awareness increases when you are able to accurately assess your strengths and weaknesses

Crow_PeacockSelf-awareness is a key component of emotional intelligence, of which self-confidence and accurate self-assessment are key characteristics. Self-confidence is certainty about one’s self-worth and capabilities, and accurate self-assessment is knowing one’s strengths and limits. I was vividly reminded to these two attributes a few weeks ago, when an elderly relative recounted a story from Indian folklore that I recall from cobwebbed memories of my childhood.

An elegant black crow lived in a forest absolutely satisfied and happy with his life. But one day, while flying through the forest, he came upon a swan. Landing in front of the swan, he said. “Swan, you are so vividly white and I am so black. You are so beautiful – you are the happiest bird in the world.” Much to his surprise, the swan replied. “Actually, I always thought I was the happiest bird on earth until I saw the parrot. The parrot has two colours. I now know that the parrot is the happiest bird on the planet.” Continue reading

Sentiment (emotional intelligence) HAS a place in business!

BostonBlackieA long-time subscriber (thanks Ric!) sent me this quote stated boldly by a villain in an old Boston Blackie movie:

Sentiment has no place in business

And he posed the question – true or false? Well (not surprisingly 🙂 ), I have an opinion. I say “false”, absolutely false. And that’s because “sentiment”, to me, means emotional intelligence (link to a self-assessment).

True, historically, emotions have rarely been welcome in the workplace. In fact, in some organizations we were told: emotions are messy, they get in the way, and they should be left at home. In fact, to be honest, you might hear that in some organizations even today. All this because, traditionally, business believed that good decisions were based on rational thinking and logic. But the reality is that emotions are a fundamental part of who we are. Continue reading

Working more effectively with others using emotional intelligence – live audio event on May 11

Let’s face it … unless you work in a vacuum, you have to count on others to get things done. And sometimes that’s easier said than done! It doesn’t matter if it’s the demanding boss, the caustic customer, the timid team-member, the agreeable assistant, the cooperating client, the exasperating employee, or just the plain ol’ irritating individual; you are going to have to work with all of them at one point or another. Emotional intelligence (or EQ) is your ability to understand your own emotions and those of others, and to act appropriately using these emotions. And it’s a fact – people with higher levels of EQ consistently have greater success in working with others. They’re more resilient and adaptable when things go wrong, and as a result, they’re held in the highest regard by their bosses, co-workers, employees and others. Indeed, studies show that your EQ is a better predictor of your professional success than either your IQ or your technical skills.

So how’s your EQ? What are you doing to develop and harness the power of these proven performance tools? Let me help you.  Join me for a fast-paced and content-rich hour in which you’ll learn not only what exactly EQ is, but perhaps more importantly, specific and practical tools to work more effectively with all types of people in all types of situations.

Click here to register now.

Reduce or even eliminate the stress and frustration that often comes from working with others! The skills you learn here will make a profound difference in your career – and your life! Here’s just some of what you’ll learn:

  • How strengthening your emotional intelligence is vital to your success AND will have a lasting, positive effect on you … your team … your department … and your organization
  • The five main components of emotional intelligence, what they mean, and why they matter
  • How to manage your anxieties and self-doubts as a leader
  • Strategies to keep your emotions in check, no matter how tense the situation
  • How to evaluate and respond to criticism using the simple (yet powerful) “window” model
  • Powerful language tools to demonstrate empathy and active listening
  • Proven techniques to use emotional intelligence to motivate and inspire cohesive teams
  • Specific approaches to influence others and build consensus using emotional intelligence

Join me on May 11, 2011 at 11 AM MDT. Early bird pricing in effect ONLY until this Wednesday May 4!

Click here to register, or for more information.

What do you want to know about emotional intelligence?

Unless you work in a vacuum, you have to count on others to get things done. Which means … that you have to work with a myriad of different personalities in the workplace. Let’s face it, some days that’s easier said than done!  Here’s where emotional intelligence (or EQ) really matters.  EQ  is your ability to understand your own emotions and those of others, and to act appropriately using these emotions. And it’s a fact – people with higher levels of EQ consistently have greater success in working with others.  Indeed, studies show that your EQ is a better predictor of your professional success than either your IQ or your technical skills.

On Wednesday May 11, I’m leading a live Audio Conference on the subject of EQ, and I’ll be opening the lines for questions.  What is one thing that you’d like to learn about emotional intelligence that will help you work more effectively with others in the workplace?  Go to www.AskMerge.com to ask your question and I’ll answer as many as I can on May 11.

And while you’re at www.AskMerge.com, be sure test your own EQ using our simple and free self-assessment.  Just click on the link on the bottom left of the screen.

How emotionally intelligent are you?

Researchers and business experts agree that people with high emotional intelligence (or EQ) are consistently the top-performers in organizations. They’re more resilient and adaptable when things go wrong, and as a result, they’re held in the highest regard by their bosses, co-workers, employees and others. In fact, studies show that your EQ is a better predictor of your professional success than either your IQ or your technical skills.

So what’s your EQ?  Take this self-assessment to gain an insight into your EQ level.  And as always, let me know what you think?  Is EQ as important a predictor of professional success as the experts say?