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Tag Archives: introverts

Maximize introvert power by tapping into their strengths

Extroversion versus introversion.  Despite numerous studies and anecdotal situations that show otherwise, people still continue to assume that somehow extroverts are more successful in the workplace than introverts.  As I have blogged about in the past, that is simply not true.  Introvert power comes from tapping into what makes introverts different from extroverts, and not by taking on more extrovert traits.  In fact, in the past I have blogged about how introverts lead, and how introverts network.

Which is why I was delighted when my professional colleague Dave Byrnes agreed to guest on the blog today.  Dave is known as The Introverted Networker, and not surprisingly, he helps introverts use sales and networking to succeed in their business and careers.  Today he writes about how leaders (extroverts or introverts) can help their introverted employees maximize their introvert power and productivity.

Convert Your Introverts for Greater Productivity

There has been a lot of press about the power of introverts and their differences from extroverts in recent times. While better understanding is great as a leader, you may be asking yourself how this affects the bottom line.

How can you turn these insights into increased productivity from your introverts and improve job satisfaction so they stick around longer? Continue reading

Is business networking difficult for you?

networkingThe benefits of business networking are invaluable. When you meet new people, you learn interesting ideas, build relationships outside your immediate circle, and create an environment that cultivates new opportunities. But, many people, particularly those who consider themselves introverts, find initiating conversations with strangers to be awkward and uncomfortable. In the past, I’ve addressed this in several posts including this one: Introverts can be great networkers too! Here are three more ideas to help get the dialogue going. Continue reading

Success strategies for introvert leaders – early bird deadline on September 30

Introvert written in search bar on virtual screenOur next online event – Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day! – is coming up quickly. In fact, the early bird deadline to register is almost here – only two more days to take advantage of significant savings – just until Wednesday September 30.

If you’re an introvert, unfortunately, fair or not, you’re often at a leadership disadvantage. In a world that frequently associates outspokenness with leadership, introverts are often misjudged, or even worse, undervalued for their leadership skills. But it’s time to take control and change this erroneous perception. On October 7, I’ll be leading a live online event “Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day!” and I hope you’ll join me. In one fast-paced content-rich hour, I’ll give you the tools you need to make the most of your natural traits so that you are recognized as a competent, capable and collaborative leader who knows how to get things done! Through my leadership development practice, I’ve been privileged to work closely with hundreds of exceptional introverted leaders, and in this power-packed event, I’ve distilled their critical success factors into one jam-packed hour. Bottom line: you don’t have to become an extrovert in order to be a powerful leader.

Click here to register now

Here’s just some of what you’ll learn: Continue reading

Do extroverts always make better leaders than introverts?

For the last few weeks, I have been diligently researching material for a new online program I am doing next month titled Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day! and I came across this very interesting 2011 paper that I couldn’t resist sharing on the blog today. A study in the Academy of Management Journal looked at whether your tendency to be an extrovert or an introvert affects your ability to be a good leader. Extrovert vs Introvert Concept of Choosing Between the Two ChoicFirst let me quickly define the two. Contrary to popular belief, the difference between extroverts and introverts is not how outgoing or shy a person is, but rather where the person’s energy comes from. Introverts lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds, and tend to recharge by spending time alone. Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people; they actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.

Current mainstream experience and the popular press tends to suggest that extroversion is a better indicator of leadership effectiveness, but researchers Grant, Gino and Hofmann discovered that this is not the case. To answer the question posed in the title of this post, whether or not extroverts or introverts are more effective as leaders depends on the motivation and skill level of the employee being supervised. Continue reading

Introverts make great leaders! – live online event on October 7

Business man pointing the text: Are You an Introvert?Do you generally tend to be quieter, more reserved, and less likely to speak up until you’ve had adequate time to think things through? If so, then you’re probably an introvert, and unfortunately often at a leadership disadvantage. Right or wrong, in a world that frequently associates outspokenness with leadership, introverts such as you are often misjudged, or even worse, undervalued for your leadership skills. But it’s time to take control and change this erroneous perception. On October 7, I’ll be leading a live online event “Success Strategies for the Introverted Leader: “Quiet” CAN win the day!” and I hope you’ll join me. In one fast-paced content-rich hour, I’ll give you the tools you need to make the most of your natural traits so that you are recognized as a competent, capable and collaborative leader who knows how to get things done!

If you’ve met me personally, then you know that I’m an extrovert, so you may wonder what I could possibly teach you on this topic. After all, I haven’t walked in exactly your shoes. But … don’t underestimate what I can offer you. I’ve been privileged to work closely with hundreds of exceptional introverted leaders in my leadership development practice. Through my thousands of conversations with these very effective leaders, I’ve been able to distill their critical success factors into this powerful online program. The good news is that you don’t have to become an extrovert in order to be a powerful leader.   Introverts bring strong leadership abilities to the table; but you have to know how to showcase and use your strengths to their best advantage. And this is exactly where I can help!

Click here to register now

In one power-packed hour, you’ll learn how to capitalize on your strengths and avoid the pitfalls. You owe it to yourself to maximize your leadership potential! And if you act by September 30, you can take advantage of early bird savings. Here’s just some of what you’ll learn: Continue reading

Introverts can be great networkers too!

Like it or not, networking is critical to your career success. The ability to develop and maintain contacts and personal connections with a variety of people leads to increased business opportunities, more job possibilities and long-term relationships. But … it comes easier to some than others. As an extrovert myself, I find it fairly easy to attend events, initiate conversations, and keep the dialogues and relationships going. But I am very aware that there are many among us who dread the thought of networking!

Which is why I found myself very interested in a conversation I happened to have last week with a professional colleague. Somewhere in our exchange, she confided to me that she’s an introvert. Surprised, I uttered the first thought that came to my mind. “You’re such a good networker, I never would have thought you to be an introvert,” I exclaimed. “It’s true,” she said. “I loathe talking to strangers, and to be perfectly honest, I don’t like being in groups of people either.” As I stared at her with raised eyebrows, she continued on to tell me how she has found ways to network that fit her style as an introvert. So for those amongst you who find yourself in the same dilemma, I thought you might want to hear about two specific things she does to overcome her natural aversion to networking.

  1. When she goes to events, she focuses on individuals rather than groups. By seeking to have a few meaningful one-on-one conversations rather than interacting with groups of people, she’s able to make networking fit her introverted style.
  2. Because she’s naturally shy, she uses LinkedIn to initiate or continue relationships. If there is someone she wants to connect with, she looks them up on LinkedIn and sends them a connection request, saying a little bit about herself, and if applicable, how they met or know each other. Getting things started online is not as stressful as face-to-face.

So if you’re someone who dislikes the traditional definition of networking (or even if you’re not), what are some of your ideas to get past the fear and aversion and make it work for you and your career? We all want to know!