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Tag Archives: making the sale

To make the sale, show value to your buyer

What does it take to make the sale?  I’ve always believed that if you want people to buy — buy your product, or your service, or even you — then you need to show them, clearly, in brilliant technicolour, the compelling value that you have to offer.  Which means that you do whatever it takes to help them see, first-hand, what it is that you or your product or your service does to meet their needs or make their lives easier.  If you want to make the sale to me, then you need to show me what value I receive.  Yet I come across so many people who don’t get this!  A few years ago, I blogged about the leasing agent to tried (unsuccessfully) to get me to rent an apartment without letting me see it.  She was too lazy to even let me see the inside of an apartment that she wanted me to lease; apparently the photos she posted on the Internet should have been sufficient.

She wanted me to buy without telling me what I was going to receive!

ETA words in thought cloud over man or person thinking of estimaWell a few weeks ago, I came across a similar situation, this time with Dell, the computer folks.  My hard drive failed (a story in itself) and in order to restore my system we had to contact Dell to get them to send the USB recovery key.

“It will cost $27” said the unhelpful lady on the phone.

“Okay, when can I expect to receive it?” I asked.

“I can’t tell you until you pay for it.”

“If I can’t get it in a couple of day, tops, then I’ll go in another direction.  So I need to know the expected delivery date in order to make my decision as to whether to get it or not” Continue reading

Become more persuasive by applying the action story-telling technique

DramaTriangleI often write in the blog about what it takes to become more persuasive in the workplace (including this column I wrote last year for Profit Magazine).  A few weeks ago, one of my professional colleagues offered me a perspective I’ve never considered before, one that caught my attention enough that I want to share it with you.  She said that when you seek to influence others, you can make your message more persuasive simply by adapting the classic villain-victim-hero action story-telling technique.  Let me explain.

The customary formula for writing an action story requires that you have at least one villain, one victim and one hero.  And you can do the same for the business world.  But when you adapt this formula for the workplace, Continue reading

What does it take to become more persuasive?

Okay, I’m super pumped! Today marks my first column for ProfitGuide.com, the online version of Profit Magazine, a Canadian business magazine aimed at entrepreneurs, focusing on how to find opportunity and seize it, management practices, case studies and access to peer groups. Today’s column is titled How to become a persuasive triple-threat and explores what it takes to get more people to buy your ideas.

ProfitGuide Continue reading

How to persuade and influence senior management

CFMD_OctNov2013As your skills as an exceptional leader and communicator grow, your level of interaction with your organization’s senior management will increase as well.  You’ll find yourself in situations where your ability to persuade and influence others will stand you in good stead.  For continued success, it’s important to realize that how and what you communicate needs to adapt to fit differing audiences.  Specifically, you need to adjust your message and method of delivery so that it’s relevant and meaningful for an audience of senior managers.  And this is exactly the subject of an article I was recently invited to write for the Canadian Facility Management and Design Magazine.

Selling to Senior Executives was penned as part of the magazine’s regular Management Memo column, and in it, I offer four suggestions to significantly increase the likelihood that a facility manager’s message is heard, respected and acted upon.  Continue reading

Be prepared to show what you “sell” – 2nd edition

Celiac Supplies, a gluten-free grocery store in Brisbane Australia has made worldwide news this week, but not necessarily for the right reasons.  Earlier this week on March 26, in response to a photo and post by a Reddit user, the Adelaide Now newspaper ran a story about how the owner of this store has decided to charge potential customers $5 for “just looking”.  Since then, the story has gone viral.  The owner’s reasons — she was spending hours each week giving free advice to people who were then leaving and buying the similar product elsewhere.  In her words “I’m not here to dispense a charity service for the Coles and Woolworths [large grocery stores] to make more money.”

$5_Just_Looking

[Photo: BarrettFox/Reddit]

Continue reading

Be prepared to show what you “sell”

I just had a very odd experience earlier this week.

I’m trying to help my in-laws move out of their house into an apartment.  One came up for rent in a building they like.  I called the agent who was listing it.

“Are they looking at renting it now?” she asked.  “Because it’s vacant.”

“They might” I replied.  “It depends on whether they like it and if it meets their needs. If it doesn’t, then they’ll wait for the right one to come along.”

“Well, no offense”, she says, “but if they’re not going to rent it, then I don’t want to waste my time showing it.”

Nonplussed, I paused.  “Well I can’t really tell you if it will fit their needs until we see it.”

“Well I’ve just posted some very nice photos on the Internet.  You can see what it looks like there.”

What I said to myself was “You’re kidding, right?  Who rents an apartment based solely on photos that they see on the Internet?”.  What I said out loud was “If you want me to rent it, then I have to look at it before I can make a decision.  You decide if it’s something you want to do or not.”

“Okay, let me think about it and I’ll call you back” she said as we ended the call.

She still hasn’t called me back, and quite frankly I’m not holding my breath.  For her sake, I hope the reason is because the apartment has already been leased.  But the whole odd incident got me thinking …

I’ve always believed that if you want people to buy — buy your product, or your service, or even you — then you need to show them, clearly, in brilliant technicolour, the compelling value that you have to offer.  Which means that you do whatever it takes to help them see, first-hand, what it is that you or your product or your service does to meet their needs or make their lives easier.  Yet this lady was too lazy to even let me see the inside of an apartment that she wanted me to lease.

So … is this okay?  Am I being unreasonable when I expect that those who are trying to sell me their ideas, products, services, or even themselves will do whatever is necessary to make sure that I see the all the advantages and benefits that will accrue to me?  Or is this just an example of the new way to “sell”?  C’mon, tell me what you think — am I on the mark, or am I way off base?!