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Tag Archives: respectful workplace

Courtesy and respect are key to building workplace relationships

CandleWax. It’s normally rigid and brittle, but a little bit of warmth can soften it right up, and it can then be molded into any shape you please.

It’s a lot like working with people. A little bit of warmth (read: courtesy and respect) can relax and temper your relationships, and make those who work with you more flexible, agreeable and cooperative.

Warning: when it comes to relationships, your intention matters. If you’re being outwardly polite simply to manipulate another person, then you’ll quickly be found out and your scheming will backfire. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – take advantage of their questioning and impatient nature

Millennial08Earlier this week I put forward the somewhat controversial suggestion that you be willing to adjust your work schedule for your Millennials’ social engagements. Yeah, I heard from a “few” of you! 😛  Well, here’s another (less outrageous :)) idea for how to engage and motivate your Millennials.

Take advantage of their questioning and impatient nature. Not only do Millennials question everything, but they’re impatient for the answers; they want them now! So rather than fight this fundamental character trait, take advantage of it. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – be flexible with your schedule

Millennial07Millennials, those born between 1980 and 1994, are getting noticed! Also known as Generation Y, this growing demographic is increasingly making its mark in the workplace. Because Millennials see the world through different value filters than the generations who came before them, it often leads to tension and conflict, but it doesn’t have to! These “kids” are creative, adaptable, realistic, tolerant, and technologically-savvy, but only if you know how to tap into their potential. Since May, off-and-on, we’ve been discussing how to best motivate and harness the potential of this workplace demographic (links to previous posts are below), and this week I have two more specific ideas.

Be flexible when it comes to work scheduling. Be willing to adjust your schedule for their social engagements. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – invite them to get involved

Millennial10Earlier this week, I blogged about one way to tap into and harness the immense potential that the Millennial generation brings to the workplace – give them variety (but with structure). I had promised to offer up another idea today, so here it is.

Invite them to get involved. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – give them variety (but with structure)

Millennial13In previous blog posts, I’ve offered up specific ideas on how to work more effectively with the Millennial generation, the newest entrants into the workplace. By the way, just in case you didn’t know, Millennials are defined as those born between 1980 and 1994.

In today’s and my next blog post, I have two more specific approaches to give you.

Give them variety … but with structure. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – give them what they need to get the job done

Millennial12Earlier this week, I started a dialogue once again about what it takes to tap into and capitalize on the creativity, adaptability, and technology-smarts of the Millennial generation.  I said that it was important to give them structure by clearly stating your expectations for results.  But here’s another key thing to remember.

Once you’ve given them the structure they need, then it’s just as important to give them what they need to get the job done! Continue reading

Working with Millennials – state your expectations for results

Millennial04Four weeks ago, I gave you two specific tips on how to work more effectively with the Millennial generation – give them respect (despite their youth) and view them as free agents.  I had a few requests for some more ideas, so today, and in my next post, I offer you two more.

State your expectations for results.  When you are clear about the outcomes you desire, you give your Millennials structure, which they thrive on.  Continue reading

Working with Millennials – view them as free agents

Millennial02Earlier this week I blogged about what it takes to tap into the incredible energy and potential that Millennials can bring to your organization.  Specifically, I talked about giving them respect, despite their youth.  Here is a second specific way that you can attract, engage and motivate the youngest generation in your department or company. Continue reading

Working with Millennials – give them respect (despite their youth)

Millennial01The Millennial generation (also known as Generation Y) is a rapidly-growing demographic in today’s workplace.  Defined as those born between 1980 and 1994 — so roughly between the ages of 19 and 33 — they have puzzled, bewildered and in some cases frustrated their Baby Boomer and Generation X managers and supervisors. Millennials see the world through different value filters than those who came before them, and in many cases, this leads to tension and workplace conflict between the generations.  The truth is that Millennials are the most creative, adaptable, realistic, tolerant, and technologically-savvy group to ever arrive in the workplace, and they can take you and your organization to amazing places that you may have never imagined.  BUT … only if you know how to tap into this immense potential.  Not surprisingly, I am often asked about how to work more effectively with Millennials.  So this week, in today’s and my next post, I’ll give you a couple of specific ideas. Continue reading

How to get respect in the workplace despite your youth

I recently got an email from a new graduate who’s been in the job for about six months. He feels that because of his youth, he’s not always taken seriously by his more veteran co-workers, and he asked for some advice on how to best go about earning greater influence and responsibility. His email reminded me of an article I wrote in CGA Magazine back in 2008 on this very subject in which I laid out four specific and practical ideas to move positively in this direction. Apparently, some workplace issues are timeless!

Given that thousands of university and college graduates have just recently started in their first internships or full-time jobs, I thought it was appropriate to point people to this article. In Welcome to Your First Job, I outline four things that you can do to get respect despite your youth – learn more, share your knowledge, get involved and write well. Give it a read, and then come on back and offer your sage advice to these thousands of new entrants into the workforce.